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So you have the ability to produce a flame, now what?  

 

GregBO
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3416
07/10/2019 8:57 pm  

While anyone in a survival situation just wants to build a fire, there are several key factors that you need to consider to obtain the outcome you need.

Warmth, Cooking and Signaling are the primary reasons for starting a fire.  Understanding how, when and where to build each type could be critical for your outdoor survival.

http://survivor-magazine.com/types-of-fire/ has a good synopsis of the above three types, so I will share tips for the signal fire,  the least utilized type.

Signal Fires.  Many hikers who become lost do so with all the supplies necessary to build and utilize a signal fire nearby.  Making a signal fire conserves your bodily resources, your food & water, as well as ensuing that you do not travel further away from frequently used transportation paths.   In many true wilderness locations however, this is not the case and you must travel towards transportation paths, but be ready to use a signal fire when possible.

Materials for a signal fire can be found while traveling and carried until sufficient quantities are on had to meet your goal ... that being to create a hot fast fire that will produce copious amounts of smoke.  Remember, Search and Rescue team members are training to observe those stimuli that do not normally occur in nature.  A large column of black smoke and the smell of burning plastic are not normally part of nature.  Helping them locate you is your mission.

Tips:

  1. Build High.  Smoke and flames have a better chance of being seen from elevation than recessed in a valley.  A flat spot with access to fuel is ideal, after all the skills required in building a fire remain the same, it's only the outcome that changes.
  2. Try to only use a signal fire for signaling, a cooking fire for cooking and a warmth fire for providing warm.  While you can build a fire that will accomplish aspects of each, it will not be ideal for any one of them however.  Always allow your circumstances to determine what you need to prioritize on creating.
  3. Smoke Generation.  Using a tripod to hold/support your smoke producing materials is vital as you need air and updrafts to create lots of smoke.  The longer the tripod sticks/branches, the better as it will support more combustible material. Rope, your belt, a strap or large quantities of green vine will help hold it together. The Green leaves / limbs tied to the tripod will provide the smoke that will summon rescue resources, just don't forget to leave an opening at the base to light your tender.
  4. Fuel.  If you don't need it, burn it,  anything man made will produce thick black smoke.  Natural materials that are hard to burn will do just a well, however there is nothing like burning rubber or plastic to create large plumes of dark smoke.  The harder something is to burn the better it is at producing smoke.

Just a reminder, you have to practice fire making frequently to build and maintain this skill.  Also, you need to obtain muscle memory in using the fire starting tools you have available every time you are outdoors. This includes using your gray noodle and associated senses; what do you need to start the fire and what do you need to keep it going, while producing lots of smoke, and where will you most frequently find that resource.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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The Evil Genius
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1858
07/10/2019 11:00 pm  

Great subject and take a look at this:


Beered by GregBO and #Redpillbible
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GregBO
Admin
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3416
08/10/2019 12:53 pm  

@pistolpete

This is maslow level one for ensuring that you can make a fire.  Two pieces of processed wood and string. Everything else is available from nature.  Incredible that he produced a viable ember in less than a minute, and he used a bundle of wet grass to produce the initial fire.   Very cool, and he stated that he's only done this about 30 times.  

Thanks for sharing, this will have to go into a hiking kit.  Along side a magnesium stick of course, $2.50 at Harbor Freight. 

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


Beered by #Redpillbible
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