So you have decided to purchase a firearm, what next:  

 

GregBO
Admin
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2133
07/12/2018 12:55 am  

Remind yourself often that owning a firearm is an ongoing expense that does not end with the initial purchase.  You must train to proficiency and then maintain your skill set, you must care and maintain your weapon, and most importantly; you must make time to develop your confidence in using the weapon, as well as learning when and how to use your weapon for sport or self protection.  

Before you walk out the door after purchasing your weapon.

The seller should provide you with a manual for the weapon, as well as be willing to provide training on the basic functions for the firearm.  You should also receive hands on instruction regarding field stripping the weapon. You should never attempt to perform any type of disassembly beyond basic field stipping a weapon. Gunsmiths attend courses for doing this and have the proper equipment, knowledge and access to any required parts to completely disassemble your weapon.  Attempting to go beyond basic weapons maintenance & cleaning will result in your rendering the weapon unusable and taking it to a Gunsmith for repair. Replacing lost or damaged parts is expensive, so just don’t do it.

Purchase personal protective equipment before firing, this included properly fitting eye & hearing protection.  You do not want to take a chance that someone else’s eye or hearing protection will “properly fit.” Eye or hearing loss is permanent and buying your own “PPE” gear up front will keep you from renting equipment, while ensuring your safety.

Limit purchasing weapons accessories or supplies beyond those basic items needed to clean and protect your weapon.  Your local gun shop or range is again a great place to ask and obtain advice. Once you become more familiar with discharging your weapon and traveling to and from the shooting area, then you can purchase additional equipment and supplies.  Keep it simple, inexpensive and fun at the beginning.

Before you attempt to fire your weapon.

Take a Firearms Safety Class before you scheduling any type of livefire activity.  These classes are all about safety and preventing accidental discharges. Watching Youtube videos is not a substitute for live, hands-on instruction.  This class does not take the place of working with a knowledgeable instructor, but is as important as this later work. The class will be cheaper and more focused than having a range instructor both discuss Firearms safety and weapons instructions.

Schedule time with a certified instructor at your local range or firing area.  Big Bubba is not a certified instructor and will invariably introduce unsafe habits that will only cost you time, and cause trouble that you will have to  work through to become a safe and proficient shooter. Tell the instructor your experience level and how you plan to use your new weapon. There is usually an additional cost associated with individual instruction, but it should be free if you purchase your weapon from the Gun Shop/range.  

Never assume that you know how to properly use a weapon, safety first.  The instructor will assist you in obtaining a proper sight picture, proper firing stance, developing a consistent & repeatable grip for your weapon, learning how to squeeze the trigger, and other tips for you to use in developing safe & reliable shooting techniques.  Once again, Youtube is not your friend for this type of training.  You will develop your own style and should not try to be "John Wayne", "Bruce Willis" or anyone else you have seen use weapons on film or television.

Feel confident in asking questions from the experts, they want you to develop the correct skills, habits and abilities just as much as you do.  Remember, safety first.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


Quote
MG-ɹǝʍo┴
Founder..
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2924
07/12/2018 12:58 am  

So you have decided to purchase a firearm, what next:  

What's next? Don't tell anyone, especially the government! 


ReplyQuote
Old Buck
Arbiter
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1791
07/12/2018 1:24 am  

Don't forget the maintenance.  Gun oil, cleaning kit, patches, cleaning mat and maybe a bench vise.

Kind of like buying a car, don't forget the cost of oil changes and tires, or even auto insurance!

 

Do NOT chase tail. Turn yours around and live FREE!


ReplyQuote
Sobieski
Arbiter
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 215
07/12/2018 2:22 am  

I recommend the class at gander mtn.  It was top notch


ReplyQuote
The Evil Genius
Admin
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1425
07/12/2018 2:38 am  

Great advice GregBo, I would add only one caveat: choose a weapon based upon the use you intend. For example 10mm is a great round BUT if used in a home a miss is going to travel through walls as will a .223, or a .357. Best home defense weapon is a 12 gauge shot gun with some #4 or #6 shot. 


ReplyQuote
Stealth
Founder
Joined: 11 months ago
Posts: 38
07/12/2018 3:25 pm  

Great post! Spot on... I wish I knew all these things up front.

Buying your first gun can be slightly overwhelming.  I walked into a gun shop and handled the equipment to find one that seemed to fit my hand.  I initially had my eye on a CZ-75, per a mgtow recommendation, but found I had trouble operating the high-tension slide. What I didn't learn from handling non-live weapons was how they would fire. But you can do that by renting.  In general, a heavier gun is easier to fire. And ammo quickly adds up to cost more than the firearm.

In my neck of the woods there are many Big Bubbas, and I learned to shoot from youtube videos and the occasional gun range monitor/local instructor letting me know I was pulling my trigger too far to the right.  I don't think I suffered from learning that way, although I am the type to do a lot of research and pay attention to detail.  On my last trip to the range, I found my handling of guns has finally become confident. I've gotten used to the kickback and how not to try to prevent it, but to control the site position after each shot, and to grip like a firm handshake. I've found the right combo of PPE and a range that has exhaust fans so I'm not inhaling all the gun smoke, and can just focus on shooting.


ReplyQuote
uoSʎWodɹɐH
Founder.
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 685
07/12/2018 5:47 pm  

Everything is legal in a lawless society.  I agree with MGtower  buy it without asking  permission from authorities because those closet socialist will send you on the most paperwork intensive rout to firearm ownership.  Just sneak into an Arkansas  wall-mart  with fake id  make your purchase and disappear..

No background checks or waiting periods.

My first shotgun was a 12Gage  pump from a store in Spiro Oklahoma Called  Otasco.. short for Oklahoma Tire and supply Company.  

A model 67 Springfield, and   I was 13or14  years old.  My father was with me, but I made the purchase  myself.   Mid 1970s

Times have changed men.  I fully agree with  safety first,  But I do not agree with restrictive gun laws..

I have never killed anyone in 56 years on this earth. 

 

L&R

  

I was bound to be misunderstood, and I laugh at the idiots who misunderstand me! Kind mockery toward the well-intentioned and unfettered cruelty toward all would-be prison guards of my creative possibilities. In this way I learn to revel as much in misunderstanding as in understanding and take pleasure in worthy opponents. Making language fluid, flowing like a river, yet precise and pointed as a dirk, contradicts the socialistic purpose of language and makes for a wonderful verbal dance—a linguistic martial art with constant parries that hone the weapon that is the two edged sword of my mouth.


ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2133
07/12/2018 7:51 pm  
Posted by: Ye Olde Buck

Don't forget the maintenance.  Gun oil, cleaning kit, patches, cleaning mat and maybe a bench vise.

Kind of like buying a car, don't forget the cost of oil changes and tires, or even auto insurance!

 

Check. Important enough that I mentioned it not once, and not twice, but three times!  Thanks for seconding this advice.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2133
07/12/2018 7:53 pm  

Great post Stealth and thanks for sharing your the outcome of your continues training and practice with your firearm.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 2133
07/12/2018 7:55 pm  
Posted by: uoSʎWodɹɐH

 

Times have changed men.  I fully agree with  safety first,  But I do not agree with restrictive gun laws..

I have never killed anyone in 56 years on this earth. 

 

L&R

  

Absolutely correct, people kill people ... firearms are only on instrument that may be used in the act.  When treated with respect, weapons are inert but filled with potential.  Safety first.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


ReplyQuote
Advertisements