Friday Night Organ---a Black Friday Special!  

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The Evil Genius
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29/11/2019 7:33 pm  

Georg Muffat (FRIDAY May 30th 1653– 1704) was born in Megève, Duchy of Savoy (now in France). He studied in Paris between 1663 and 1669, where his teacher is often assumed to have been Jean Baptiste Lully. This assumption is largely based on the statement "For six years ... I avidly pursued this style which was flowering in Paris at the time under the most famous Jean Baptiste Lully." This is ambiguous as to whether the style was flourishing under Lully, or that Muffat studied under Lully. In any case, the style which the young Muffat learned was unequivocally Lullian and it remains likely that he had at least some contact with the man himself.

After leaving Paris, he became an organist in Molsheim, near Strasberg (probably the Jesuit College Church which has a fine 1781 Silberman organ but of any instrument in 1670 I could find no record.) and Sélestat. Later, he studied law in Ingolstadt, afterwards settling in Vienna. He could not get an official appointment, so he traveled to Prague in 1677, then to Salzburg, where he worked for the archbishop for some ten years. In about 1680, he traveled to Italy, there studying the organ with Bernardo Pasquini, a follower of the tradition of Girolamo Frescobaldi; he also met Arcangelo Corelli, whose works he admired very much. From 1690 to his death, he was Kapellmeister to the bishop of Passau.

Muffat is most well known for the remarkably articulate and informative performance directions printed along with his collections of string pieces Florilegium Primum and Florilegium Secundum (First and Second Bouquets) in 1695 and 1698.

Here is the COMPLETE collection of Muffat’s Apparatus Musico-Organisticus. The first work in the collection is the one most commonly played and a particular favorite of mine. I also like the Ciacona. The instrument is the Johann Ignaz Egedacher, Organ of Zwettl Cistercian Monastery Church, Austria---so a southern Germanic instrument. Here is the Play list:

1.Toccata prima 0:00

2.Toccata secunda 5:04

3.Toccata tertia 10:28

4.Toccata quarta 16:07

5.Toccata quinta 21:58

6.Toccata sexta 27:32

7.Toccata septima 36:12

8.Toccata octava 45:55

9.Toccata nona 52:27

10.Toccata decima 58:37

11.Toccata undecima 1:04:03

12.Toccata duodecima et ultima 1:10:54

13.Ciacona 1:18:05

14.Passacaglia 1:23:27

15.Nova Cyclopeias Harmonica 1:37:37

And for those really interested in this excellent organ from 1731 here is a link to the Kuhn Organblau. They did the restoration:

http://www.orgelbau.ch/site/index.cfm?CFID=e9227af5-4567-4206-b71d-e2d690234b2a&CFTOKEN=0&fuseaction=orgelbau.orgelportrait&laufnummer=801570&id_art=4437&actMenuItemID=2613&vsprache=EN

I selected this particular video because the visuals are really cool and although I consider Muffat is a student of the South German organ school he is technically French. Megeve is in the southern French alps near Italy and Switzerland. In any case this particular work just doesn’t sound right on a German organ but sounds great on a French organ. YESSS I know we hear this work again in the Organisticus BUT that is an Austrian instrument. On a final note musical forms like the Ricercar, Ciacona, and Passacaglia were falling out of favor by 1700---they were considered old fashioned. Bach's lone contribution to this style; the c minor Passacaglia was written in 1706 when he was but 21 and had taken up the post of organist at Blasius Church in Muhlhausen--fresh from his experience with guess what? OLD German organ composers; Reinken, Bohm and Buxtuhude. So I think he was tipping his hat to the old generation. Anyway Muffat took a crack at it and here is his passacaglia:

Finally I would be remiss if I didn’t point out that Muffat’s repertory included a lot of other music, not necessarily organ. I tried to find a youtube of his lone surviving sacred work: Missa in Labore Requies, but was unsuccessful. I did find a really nice Sonata for solo violin. In this case not so solo but still pretty good. And the style will seem very familiar when we get to Heinrich Bieber, and Schmelzer.

Finally his Armonico Tributo Sonata No.2 in G minor. I’m including this one because it is so NOT German but clearly Italian/French in character. Muffat wrote this work after returning from Rome. It definitely shows the influence of Corelli.


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The Evil Genius
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29/11/2019 8:11 pm  

God LOVE YA Redpillbible! 

While I was researching this weeks topic I came across this and it is totally cool---has nothing to do with organ or Muffat---this one is for you my brother:

AND THIS:


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#Redpillbible
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29/11/2019 10:00 pm  
Posted by: @pistolpete

God LOVE YA Redpillbible! 

While I was researching this weeks topic I came across this and it is totally cool---has nothing to do with organ or Muffat---this one is for you my brother:

AND THIS:

Love you too man. I enjoyed both of the videos. First of all I just wanted to say that is a cool device that guy was using, and it looks like he mastered it too, I wonder if it was him that invented and crafted that thing. I’ve never seen it and was impressed, so thank you for that. 

After hearing the first video, the music playing reminded me off a Role Playing video game music. Then I looked at the comments on the video and the first comment I saw was funny in reference to the same thing I was thinking.  And the second video was cool too, I liked the way the music switched around the 1:18 mark, the guy made it sound really cool how he started making it sound different, the way he mixed it was awesome.

But yeah man that’s a cool looking musical instrument.

#Remember therefore how thou hast received and heard, and hold fast, and repent. If therefore thou shalt not watch, I will come on thee as a thief, and thou shalt not know what hour I will come upon thee. (Revelation 3:3)


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The Evil Genius
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30/11/2019 1:13 am  

The hurdy-gurdy dates from about the 9th century so it is about 1000 year old but I think its coming back.

 


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Travis3000
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30/11/2019 1:43 am  

I really dislike the fact that it's "black" Friday.  I prefer Aryan Friday.  


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The Evil Genius
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30/11/2019 1:50 am  

Fuck off Travis...if you cannot enjoy the tunes I post then go to hell. Post your stupid B.S. on some other thread. 


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Travis3000
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30/11/2019 2:03 am  

Who said I can't enjoy the tunes?

 


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The Evil Genius
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30/11/2019 5:38 am  

Its simple travis. We are your brothers and we have always stood with you yet you mock the brethren. Your B.S. contributes nothing. We have given you a lot of advice and offer our aid yet spit upon us. Fine. Do as you will but please don't fuck my posts with tour B.S. 


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Travis3000
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30/11/2019 5:44 am  
Posted by: @pistolpete

Its simple travis. We are your brothers and we have always stood with you yet you mock the brethren. Your B.S. contributes nothing. We have given you a lot of advice and offer our aid yet spit upon us. Fine. Do as you will but please don't fuck my posts with tour B.S. 

Thanks for sharing.  I'll still be on this forum is you change your mind.


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Old Buck
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30/11/2019 10:35 pm  

What instrument is that, a mecha-lute?!?

It looks like a bagpipe, a guitar, and a coffee grinder had a three-way, and sounds amazing!!

I keep imagining Robin Hood and Final Fantasy listening to this!

 

Do NOT chase tail. Turn yours around and live FREE!


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The Evil Genius
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01/12/2019 2:36 pm  

It is a hurdy-gurdy--totally cool


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Matcha Savage
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04/12/2019 10:40 am  
Posted by: @pistolpete

After leaving Paris, he became an organist in Molsheim, near Strasberg (probably the Jesuit College Church which has a fine 1781 Silberman organ but of any instrument in 1670 I could find no record.) and Sélestat. Later, he studied law in Ingolstadt, afterwards settling in Vienna.

It´s either "Strasbourg" (in French) or "Straßburg" (in German). Sélestat (French) accordingly is called "Schlettstadt" in German. You will find this plentifold around the contemporary borders of Germany, as many cities and territories in Central Europe have during the centuries changed hands quite often - and to unnecessarily add to everyone´s confusion.

Strasbourg is quite a fine (beautiful) city, btw, which I can attest to; just as taking a look at pictures of the historical architecture in the nearby and smaller town of Sélestat convinces me that it as well is worthy a visit. It is a lovely region with lots of sunshine throughout the year, where there are vine stocks covering most of the hills and grinning, drunken peasants tourists, who stem from "wine tastings", are a common sight to behold, as well.

Ville de Sélestat Haut-Koenigsbourg

 

This site has been a scam from the start. I am outta here.


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Matcha Savage
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04/12/2019 10:54 am  
Posted by: @pistolpete

although I consider Muffat is a student of the South German organ school he is technically French

See?! There is an analogy to this, which states that more than 90% of the worldwide law-texts are exclusively concerned with (explaining) German law, alone. I call it occupational therapy to stimulate the lawyer´s economy. Same as with the question, whether or not the musicians you so gracefully "present us as Germans" are at the end of the day "really Germans" or not. Well, it depends. 🤣 Historians can clash over this for many millennia to come! It keeps them busy and gives them something to say and sound smart about! Attendees excluded, of course.

Münster of Straßburg (or Strasbourg)

This site has been a scam from the start. I am outta here.


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The Evil Genius
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04/12/2019 4:07 pm  

Damn Matcha--I think my post are pretty good but you really add a lot to them and make it much better. One of these days you and I need to collaborate on something---it will be awesome! 


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GregBO
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04/12/2019 5:41 pm  
Posted by: @pistolpete

After leaving Paris, he became an organist in Molsheim, near Strasberg (probably the Jesuit College Church which has a fine 1781 Silberman organ but of any instrument in 1670 I could find no record.) and Sélestat. Later, he studied law in Ingolstadt, afterwards settling in Vienna. He could not get an official appointment, so he traveled to Prague in 1677, then to Salzburg, where he worked for the archbishop for some ten years. In about 1680, he traveled to Italy, there studying the organ with Bernardo Pasquini, a follower of the tradition of Girolamo Frescobaldi; he also met Arcangelo Corelli, whose works he admired very much. From 1690 to his death, he was Kapellmeister to the bishop of Passau.

 

How many organ manufactures were considered within the TOP/Elite instrument status in the high middle ages?  I would assume that there were many more mid-grade instruments available, but as with cars, the top tier had to be limited.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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GregBO
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04/12/2019 5:58 pm  

@matcha-savage

I know that I visited Strasbourg as a child but have only memories of Heidelberg as an infant.  Landstuhl, Grafenwohr and Hohenfels were the military locations I was based out of as an adult.  Germany is a beautiful country, wish that I could have seen it pre-World War.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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GregBO
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04/12/2019 6:07 pm  

@pistolpete

Beer.  A beer collaboration is always a great place to start.   Maybe in Wurzburg, central location and the Wurzburg Hofbrau (now Brau I believe) has a fantastic Pilsner.    

I remember a really cool (red & white) church, Gothic maybe, dating the the 1300's.  Great city!

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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GregBO
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04/12/2019 6:15 pm  

@matcha-savage

Check Match.  Borders have always been arbitrary at best as they are created for governmental / economic reasons.  Even in the age of GPS and a .5 meter certainty of location, borders and the associated towns have no real history regarding location through time.  Geological boundaries are more fixed, but urban growth has encompassed many communities and towns that served this purpose.  French / German ... who is to know! 🙂

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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The Evil Genius
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04/12/2019 11:21 pm  

GrebBo has a fine memory. The church you recall is the Marienkapell. It was built upon a razed synagogue and then destroyed in WWII.  Karma is a bitch.

And the organ I suspect it was built by Klais:


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Matcha Savage
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05/12/2019 5:22 pm  
Posted by: @gregbo
Posted by: @pistolpete

After leaving Paris, he became an organist in Molsheim, near Strasberg (probably the Jesuit College Church which has a fine 1781 Silberman organ but of any instrument in 1670 I could find no record.) and Sélestat. Later, he studied law in Ingolstadt, afterwards settling in Vienna. He could not get an official appointment, so he traveled to Prague in 1677, then to Salzburg, where he worked for the archbishop for some ten years. In about 1680, he traveled to Italy, there studying the organ with Bernardo Pasquini, a follower of the tradition of Girolamo Frescobaldi; he also met Arcangelo Corelli, whose works he admired very much. From 1690 to his death, he was Kapellmeister to the bishop of Passau.

 

How many organ manufactures were considered within the TOP/Elite instrument status in the high middle ages?  I would assume that there were many more mid-grade instruments available, but as with cars, the top tier had to be limited.

As far as I understood the mysteries and challenges of the craft, the limitation comes with the unfathomable and very rare skill-level necessary to predict and consequently arrange acoustic traits. The depth (we would commonly say "sheer perfection") of craft and skill achieved by the very best craftsmen in human history have us laymen and the experts alike gaping and marveling at their outright inexplicable works.

Ancient architecture would only one be of many examples - of which many are even far more recent.

This site has been a scam from the start. I am outta here.


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