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Friday Night Organ: Gabrieli, is that some new kind of pasta?  

 

The Evil Genius
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21/09/2018 6:03 pm  

No. Giovanni Gabrieli (1554 –  1612) was an Italian composer and organist. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, and represents the culmination of the style of the Venetian school (as compared to the Flemish school we have been looking at in past posts.) His works represent a solid shift from Renaissance style/idioms to the beginnings of the Baroque. 

He  was born in Venice.  While not much is known about Giovanni's early life, he studied with his uncle, the composer Andrea Gabrieli who was organist at St. Mark's Basilica from 1560-1585.  Giovanni may indeed have been brought up by his uncle, as is implied by the dedication to his 1587 book of concerti, in which he described himself as "little less than a son" to his uncle. Gabrieli went to Munich as a young man and studied under our old friend Orlando de Lassus

In 1584 he had returned to Venice, where he took up as organist at Sr. Mark's upon the death of Claudio Merulo in 1585 and a year later followed in his uncle's footsteps as the principal composer as well and following his uncle's death the following year he took the post of principal composer as well. Gabrieli also occupied the post of organist at Scuola Grande di San Rocco which was the most prestigious and wealthy of all the Venetian confraternities, and second only to San Marco itself in splendor of its musical establishment. Some of the most renowned singers and instrumentalists in Italy performed there. San Marco had a long tradition of musical excellence and Gabrieli's work there made him one of the most noted composers in Europe. The vogue that began with his influential volume Sacrae symphoniae (1597) was such that composers from all over Europe, especially from Germany, came to Venice to study. Evidently he also made his new pupils study the madrigals being written in Italy, so not only did they carry back the grand Venetian polychoral style  but also the more intimate style of madrigals; Heinrich Schutz (who we will get too shortly) and others helped transport the transitional early Baroque music north to Germany, a trend that decisively affected subsequent music history. The productions of the German Baroque, culminating in the music of Bach were founded on this strong tradition, which had its roots in Venice.

Gabrieli was increasingly ill after about 1606, at which time church authorities began to appoint deputies to take over duties he could no longer perform. He died in 1612 in Venice, of complications from a (hard to believe) kidney stone---yeah see what happens when you spend your life eating really good cheese? 

Here is his Canzona Sentimi Toni scored for Brass and Organ. 

And his Jubilate Deo again for Organ Brass and Chorus. 

Here are four other short organ works performed on a period instrument (1534) Arezzo Cathedral. 

And finally his canzon Francese:

 
Girolamo Alessandro Frescobaldi (1583 –  1643) was a musician  and contemprary of Gabrieli hailing from the duchy of Ferrara in northern Italy.  A child prodigy, Frescobaldi  was influenced by a large number of composers, including Claudio Merulo. Frescobaldi was appointed organist of St. Peter's Basilica from July 1608 until 1628 and again from 1634 until his death. Frescobaldi's printed collections contain some of the most influential music of the 17th century. His work influenced Johann Froberger, Henery Purcell and of course Bach. So once again Italian mucical influence traveled north to Germany and beyond.  Pieces from his celebrated collection of liturgical organ music, were used as models of strict counterpoint as late as the 19th century.
 
Here is his Preludio; Toccata:
 
 
And his Messa Della Domenica from the Fiori Musicali
 
 
And finally his  Toccata per L'Elevazione played on the cathedral organ of Mantau. 
 
 
Next week ITs back to the Fatherland! 
 

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The Evil Genius
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21/09/2018 6:09 pm  

Since I did mention Claudio Merulo, I should mention a little more about him. Claudio Merulo 1533 -- 1604) was an Italian composer, publisher and organist of the late Renaissance period, most famous for his innovative keyboard music and his ensemble music composed in the Venetian polychoral style. He was born in Correggio and died in Parma. 

Here is his Toccata Quarta del Sesto Tono


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MG-ɹǝʍo┴
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21/09/2018 6:46 pm  

Friday night organ?

Here's an organic blast from the past! 


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Uly The Cunning
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24/09/2018 9:03 am  

Listening to this and reading through a third or fourth time, a thought crossed my mind. The musical talent alone of this level must be very rare, that these gentlemen have traveled many places, worked for many persons and influence so many other nations still. I have always enjoyed the music, but I had not realized how rare this talent was. We all know the names Mozart and Bach, but that is like knowing Michael Jackson and Elton John. In today's modern music, so many think that they have talent and you have a compilation of noise. These men that you write about have such an astounding difference in talent. 

To take it to the next level and include the creativity, that is something that I believe this modern age of music is lacking.

"Remember, you're fighting for this woman's honor, which is probably more than she ever did."
Groucho Marx: Duck Soup (1933)


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MG-ɹǝʍo┴
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Posts: 2924
24/09/2018 9:29 am  
Posted by: Uly The Cunning

Listening to this and reading through a third or fourth time, a thought crossed my mind. The musical talent alone of this level must be very rare, that these gentlemen have traveled many places, worked for many persons and influence so many other nations still. I have always enjoyed the music, but I had not realized how rare this talent was. We all know the names Mozart and Bach, but that is like knowing Michael Jackson and Elton John. In today's modern music, so many think that they have talent and you have a compilation of noise. These men that you write about have such an astounding difference in talent. 

To take it to the next level and include the creativity, that is something that I believe this modern age of music is lacking.

Uly, I think that's why MGTOW become isolationists unto ourselves, we're dampened and hindered by gynocentrism and the happiness chase that ensues any man duped by it. 

Our creativity is our soul and we know happiness is in preserving that and not preserving a relationship. 

Men preserve and build while women work their iniquity through the indoctrination of feminism. 

Think of all the talented human beings we'll never know that fell under the scalpel of an abortionist, what marvels have we been denied in the name of woman's liberation, feminism, and all the ill it embodies. 

My disgust has been raised so high that it's become a shit-stain on the ceiling of heaven over god's thrown! I know I made myself heard there!   


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may72020
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24/09/2018 4:42 pm  

The best part of Monday is playing Friday night organ. I'm listening to this on my phone while washing and waxing my car. Thanks Evil Genius.


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GregBO
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24/09/2018 4:56 pm  

Thanks T.E.G.  I have to agree with May, being able to blare these posts in my office is great as those passing by keep asking about the works.  You're creating the image that I am an enlightened humanist!

Canzona Sentimi Toni scored for Brass and Organ reminds me too much of Commencement Processional music to really allow for enjoyment, but it is a fine piece.   The Jubilate Deo is very enjoyable which I will attribute to the chorus insertion. 

Merulo reminds me strongly of the Conan the Barbarian soundtrack!

 

The foreboding nature of Ricercare is Intriguing 

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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Uly The Cunning
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28/09/2018 12:52 pm  

Evil Genius is the name he chose to throw you off. He is actually a Super Genius. The music and information on which he provides every Friday is something that I look forward to and enjoy each week. Always something new to learn. 

"Remember, you're fighting for this woman's honor, which is probably more than she ever did."
Groucho Marx: Duck Soup (1933)


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