Friday Night Organ Johann Erasmus Kindermann  

 

The Evil Genius
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11/10/2019 5:31 pm  

Johann Erasmus Kindermann (1616 – 1655) was born in Nuremberg and studied music from an early age; at 15 he already had a job performing at Sunday afternoon concerts at the Frauenkirche (he sang bass and played violin). His main teacher was Johann Staden. In 1634/35 the city officials granted Kindermann permission and money to travel to Italy to study new music. Nothing is known about his stay in Italy; he may have visited Venice like other Nuremberg composers, for example Hans Leo Hassler. In January 1636 the city council ordered Kindermann back to take the position of second organist of the Frauenkirche. In 1640 he was employed as organist at Schwäbisch-Hall, but quit the same year to become organist of the Egidienkirche the third most important position of its kind in Nuremberg after St. Sebald and St. Lorenz. Kindermann stayed in Nuremberg for the rest of his life, and became one of the most famous musicians of the city and its most acclaimed teacher. His pupils included Augustin Pfleger, and also Heinrich Schwemmer and Georg Caspar Wecker, both of whom tutored the last generation of the Nuremberg school, which included the Krieger brothers and, most importantly,Johann Pachelbel. Kindermann was also instrumental in spreading new music in Nuremberg and south Germany, publishing not only several collections of his own music, but also works by Giacomo Carissimi, Girolamo Frescobaldi and Tarquinio Merula.

Most of Kindermann's surviving works are vocal pieces that reflect the transition from older forms to the more modern use of concertato techniques and basso continuo and explore a variety of techniques from motets for choir without instruments to concertos for solo voices after Schütz's sectional concertos, recitative and dialogue experiments (some of which look up to late Baroque works - for example, by using unprepared dissonance in the recitative for tenor and continuo). Some two hundred songs survive, on diverse texts: homophonic settings of brief poetic texts, songs for one or two voices and continuo with instrumental ritornellos, etc. Several manuscript pieces are important precursors to later church cantatas and belong to the earliest large-scale Nuremberg vocal music to have contrasting solo and choral movements.

Of the keyboard music, Harmonia Organica (1645) is the most important collection, not only in the musical sense but also in the history of music printing, as it is perhaps the earliest engraved German music. It consists of 25 contrapuntal pieces. The first fourteen are preludes, 15-20 measures long, with no imitative idiom present, each starting with all voices together. The first six cover all church modes (one prelude for both authentic and plagal modes); the next six repeat this series transposing it down a fifth. The rest of the pieces of the collection are titled fuga: some are genuine fugues, others are based on chorale melodies and use them in a variety of ways, sometimes one phrase is answering another, other times the second phrase may be used for an interlude, etc. There is one remarkable triple fugue on chorale melodies, and an early example of chorale fugue (i.e. fugue on the first phrase of the chorale melody), a model which would later be extensively used by central German composers and, most importantly, Johann Pachelbel and J.S. Bach. The final piece of Harmonia Organica is a Magnificat setting, which begins and ends with a full-fledged improvisatory, free section. Different verses are treated differently: some as cantus firmus in one of the voices, one as a fugue, one as an echo, etc. Other surviving keyboard music by Kindermann includes a number of dances for the harpsichord.

All of the following are selections from the Harmonia Organica. I was unable to find the complete set so I cobbled together what I could find. These works are very short and most were performed by Thorsten Pirkl. Note most of these have only a handful of views and almost no comments so lets cut this guy some slack and give him a few views and some thumbs up since he seems to be the ONLY organist interested enough in Kindermann's works to have actually performed them. 

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Matcha Savage
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11/10/2019 6:45 pm  
Posted by: @pistolpete

In 1634/35 the city officials granted Kindermann permission and money to travel to Italy to study new music.

This. Is. High. Culture. Advancing. Itself.

Sending this young (18 yo) man to Italy does not only speak for his remarkable musical talent, integrity and trustworthiness, but for the intelligence and strategic foresight of Nuremberg´s city counsel (the "town fathers", as we´d say in German) to make Johann Erasmus thankful and loyal to the city for decades to come! Kindermann -as soon as he got the chance- not only went back to perform at Nuremberg, but would stay there all his life and soon go on to teach younger musicians, thereby making Nuremberg grow in cultural relevance and fame.

The city´s investment into Kindermann turned out to yield plentiful returns.

It is such a pleasure to see what can happen, when people in power make wise (and "long term") decisions like that.

 

 

The construction of Nuremberg Town Hall began 1332 with the gothic hall you see behind the fountain: 

 

This site has been a scam from the start. I am outta here.


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The Evil Genius
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12/10/2019 2:33 pm  

Matcha didn't go far enough. I mentioned above an old medieval church, St. Sebaldus and low and behold it appears in the background of Matcha's pic of the Alte Rathaus. The Frauenkirche is just a couple of blocks south of the town hall. Both churches have interesting histories. 

The construction of St. Sebaldus began in 1225. the church achieved parish church status in 1255 and was completed by 1273-75. It was originally built as a Romanesque basilica. During the 14th century several important changes to the construction were made: first the side aisles were widened and the steeples made higher (1309–1345), then the late gothic hall chancel was built (1358–1379). The two towers were added in the 15th century. In the middle 17th century galleries were added and the interior was remodeled in the Baroque fashion. The church suffered serious damage during WWII  and was subsequently restored. Some of the old interior undamaged includes the Shrine of St. Sebaldus, works by Veit Stoss and the stained glass windows. In the church the famous epitaph of the Tucher family can be found.

Here is were it gets interesting. The church had an organ by the 14th century, and another by the 15th. The main organ had been built in 1440–41 by Heinrich Traxdorf, who also built two small organs for Nuremberg's Frauenkirche the following year, 1442. Until its destruction in the 20th century it was one of the oldest playable organs in the world, and all the more notable because Traxdorf was one of the first organ builders to depart from the Gothic Blockwerk organ by dividing the windchests and separating the front registers into Flute (Principal) and Octave. He was also one of the first builders to include a pedal board. The Traxdorf organ was rebuilt in 1691. The modified case was destroyed by the Allied bombers during a raid on 2 January 1945.

Kinderman would of course have experience playing Traxdorf's instruments and thus his music is very suggestive as to the capabilities and sound qualities of these early instruments.  The brick Gothic Frauenkirche stands on the eastern side of the main market. It was built between 1352 and 1362 in the grand market, in place of the former Jewish synagogue which was burned to the ground during the pogrom of 1349 (which followed an outbreak of plague). 


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Matcha Savage
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12/10/2019 3:02 pm  
Posted by: @pistolpete

Matcha didn't go far enough.

Exactly. I picked the photo whose perspective would include St. Sebaldus in the background, wondering to myself which of the churches mentioned in your post that might be, but decided to not go further into detailing/researching the historical Nuremberg, but go to bed, instead.

 Today, I very much enjoyed your narration of the story behind the church shown in the picture. Little did I know about the illustrious history of it. The modular construction of these buildings (such as St. Sebaldus and the Town Hall) is a common trait of Old World´s architecture. They were often growing and changing over centuries and thus incorporating different styles and building techniques. 

Let´s have a look at the Tucher Epitaph:

Posted by: @pistolpete

Here is were it gets interesting.

😆 Indeed. I never heard of Heinrich Traxdorf and his great influence on organ design. Not only am I guilty of -so far- not having visited and hung in Nuremberg to study its architecture and breath in its -one of a kind- atmosphere, but I am still a greenhorn when it comes to the history and inner -mechanical- workings of organs, as well. I almost would go so far as to doubt that I could build one from scratch. I mean, it would probably sound terrible.

Burning synagogues and having a traditional pogrom is a typical reaction to the outbreak of a serious disease or a bad yield or an hailstorm, well, all sorts of bad weather in general - or a rodent invasion. Historically speaking, that is. Burning and/or torturing to death witches, scientists, poets and heretics (and cats!) would be other popular options to combat the above things.

This site has been a scam from the start. I am outta here.


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#Redpillbible
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12/10/2019 5:39 pm  

 I just wanted to say that even though I do enjoy the church music, I also enjoy the church paintings that the artists be putting in them like the above paintings.  My mom sends me church calendars from the church she goes to cause in them they got some really cool photos like the above ones, and she knows I love them, so she sends them to me when she gets them.  I hang the calendars in my room and rotate photos, and they got Bible quotes attached to them.  When I read the quotes, it helps keep me at peace with myself and encouragement for the future, while enjoying the art. For some reason it helps keep my anger down. Sometimes i feel like taking justice into my own hands, John Wick style, but the scriptures calm me down. So yeah, anyway I like the music and art.  Cheers.

#Remember therefore how thou hast received and heard, and hold fast, and repent. If therefore thou shalt not watch, I will come on thee as a thief, and thou shalt not know what hour I will come upon thee. (Revelation 3:3)


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The Evil Genius
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12/10/2019 5:41 pm  

Ah yes my friend you get it too. Seeing a 700 year old building gives one perspective. 👍 🍻 


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