Friday Night Organ Redux August last year.  

 

The Evil Genius
Admin
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 1321
16/02/2019 2:37 am  

Uly has kindly agreed to archive my humble musical offerings so when western society and culture finally go up in feminist flames there will be some sort of record SOME where that SOME men composed SOME music SOME time.  And unfortunately he was missing the first 5 installments because they were on the GYOW site. I have down loaded all of the first five. Here is #1 of the five. These are of course in chronological order so they can be added into the archive without getting out of order. So the post below was my first on the GYOW site. Unfortunately although the music links work the pictures do not! SORRY!

Greeting all my MGTOW brothers! Like all immigrants I and the other MGTOW.com refugees come bearing our cultural traditions. One of those traditions was my musical offering every Friday night. I hardly missed in almost two years. So with the kind permission of the moderators and hopefully to the joy of all I will try and keep the tradition alive. First a brief explanation in order: to wit Why? Society is defined by the character of its culture. Fundamentally, cultures express their values, beliefs and principals through literature, science, art and music. As MGTOW each of us charts his own path, but we share a common culture. If one wishes to chart a path ahead, it’s a good idea to know where we have been. The culture of the past is an excellent instructor.

 

Why the organ? Permit me to indulge my vanity—I simply like it. I have since I was 12. Bach described the organ as the “King of Instruments” and over half of all his compositions are for organ. OK its not for everyone thus as many already know I often explore other instruments; the harpsichord, lute, chamber music, or brass, and sometimes vocal music. Nothing is written in stone except my stricture that the music whatever the source must pre-date 1770. Yes at times I violate my own rule but not often; and of course everyone is at liberty (and I encourage this) to post their own music on the thread. Their particular taste often forms a fine counter-point to my stuff. Since this is our first go it I will try to keep selections short and as our joining your site is a new beginning; a fresh start, the theme tonight will be “Back to The Beginning”. We will start with some of the earliest music to come down to us.

 

John Dunstable, 1390 – 1453 composed his famous Agincourt Hymn to commemorate King Henry V victory over the French at Agincourt in 1415. The music may sound odd to our modern ears but it should be recalled the period is late medieval/early renaissance. Sadly the English Reformation in the 16th century did a fine job of burning down monasteries, smashing stained glass windows and destroying works of art and music which failed to comport with the new Protestantism. Only fragments of Dunstable’s corpus of works survived the purge.

Next up is another late medieval English pioneer of polyphonic music, Leonel Power 1370 to 1445. Again only about 40 of his works were spared the flame. Here is one of them; no its not organ it is a Gloria from a Mass contained in the Old Hall Manuscript.

Well we can’t end with the English monopolizing things so time for a sober Swabian to show up and sort things out. Conrad Paumann 1410 – 1473 was born in Nuremberg blind from birth yet became a famous organist and composer of the early 15th century. Here is a short excerpt from his Fundamentum Organisandi.

And finally a non-organ instrumental arrangement on period instruments of Paumann’s Mit ganczem Willen. I think the video is pretty cool.

Obviously the organs of this period are small and comparably simple by the standards of today. Here are a couple of examples. The organ in Rysum Church in Rysum, north Germany, is the oldest instrument of its kind in northern Europe that still largely has its original pipes. It is also one of the oldest playable church organs in the world. It was originally built in 1457 and rebuilt in 1513. After undergoing several other modifications through the years it was restored to its 1513 condition by Jürgen Ahrend and Gerhard Brunzema in 1959. The stop list is:

Manual CDEFGA-g2a2

Praestant 8′[Ann. 1]

Gedackt 8′

Octave 4′

Octave 2′

Sesquialtera II [Ann. 2]

Mixtur III-IV [Ann. 2]

Trompete 8′[Ann. 2]

And here is a picture:

The organ on the west side of the Valère basilica, in Sion Switzerland is believed to have been built in 1435, is one of the oldest functioning in the world. It was probably brought to the church by Guillaume de Rarogne, who eventually ended up as the bishop of Sion. Here is a picture:

This is kind of a cool video about it:

And here is the registration:

Manual 45 notes C-c''' short bottom octave

  1. Principal 8'
  2. Oktav 4'
  3. Coppell 4'
  4. Oktav 2'
  5. Quint Major 2 2/3'
  6. Quint Minor 1 1/3'
  7. Mixtur II 1'

 

Pedal 9 notes C-c short bottom octave

  1. Subbas II 16'+8'

 

I know this very early music is a little hard on the ears so I’m always open to suggestion for a theme! A particular composer, a country or a time period is just fine. I may even do the harpsicord thing since I know Taxguy and Yumbo are really into that.

Last edited by PistolPete; August 3, 2018 at 5:28 PM.


Uly The Cunning
Admin
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 2141
16/02/2019 3:41 am  

Fantastic works. I have always found a great appreciation to those that understood music and even more to those that could create it. I enjoy nearly every instrument and have since I was a child as well. Having these compositions displayed and explained here add another dimension to TIM, putting culture and history in a place of honor and recognition. Great to see your Friday Night Organ posts have returned. 

"Remember, you're fighting for this woman's honor, which is probably more than she ever did."
Groucho Marx: Duck Soup (1933)


Beered by #Redpillbible
ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 12 months ago
Posts: 2028
16/02/2019 9:23 pm  
Posted by: Uly The Cunning

Fantastic works. I have always found a great appreciation to those that understood music and even more to those that could create it. I enjoy nearly every instrument and have since I was a child as well. Having these compositions displayed and explained here add another dimension to TIM, putting culture and history in a place of honor and recognition. Great to see your Friday Night Organ posts have returned. 

It is indeed great!  The only posts missing are the original two posts on the first site that I was unable to find. Maybe some expert snooping can find them and return them to their glory.

All others are now accounted for and archived for the benefit of all.  Thanks Pistol Pete and Uly for these efforts.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


ReplyQuote
Advertisements