Notifications
Clear all

Fixing up a 2001 Ford Explorer

 

Umbra Ascensor
Moderator
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 172
Topic starter  

Hey all, long time no see. Sorry for not being active. Life has been busy working my new job, helping install HVAC units and doing change outs on old systems. I'll try to get a video up sometime soon when things settle in. I've been on the job for a little over a month now so still getting the swing of things.

However, that's not what you all want to hear on this section.

 

Now to the point. I have a 2001 Ford Explorer XLT. It has 203369 milesish. High mileage. It is a 5.0 v8 so Good engine there. The question I have for those who are mechanically inclined/love working on cars is: how hard of a job would it be to rip out the cloth on the ceiling, insulation, weather stripping, and replace it all?

I ask thistbecause I have a water leak that I've been fighting for a few years. This is a losing fight. My weapon of choice is silcone the crap out of it. However, I have to look at doing it yet again due to it starting to leak again. I think its slowly getting worse yet again and I can't seem to find a spot to silicone anymore. I may have to have some of the electrical fixed due to shorts.

 

So in short, do you all think it's worth doing? TakeTinto account age of vehicle, mileagem etc. EngineEstill strong. If so, how costly do you think this would be and is it something I'd be better off having a body shop do for me? Also fixing a possible pinhole exhaust leak worth bothering with or no. Never failed emissions.


Beered by The Evil Genius, Old Buck, GregBO and 1 people
Quote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 3814
 

No worries Umbra, you are taking care of business and learning a job.

Had a buddy who had an older model Jeep that he used as basic transportation. Lots of mileage, point a to point b transportation.  He removed all the interior lining to address rust, leaks, new wiring, etc. Once he was finished, he put in the required stripping / caulk and then painted the entire interior with primer.  No issues with dirt, could easily repair metal fatigue issues and easy maintenance. 

Given that you are currently focused on work, treat this as the work vehicle it is.  Good tires, ease of access to those spaces that you need to upkeep and spend money where it is important.  Parts and safety related equipment, not looks - interior or exterior.  Comfortable drivers seat, but good heat and AC to make to and from work enjoyable.

If you do seal the interior with paint/caulk/stripping, the effects of the pinhole leak will go away.  Best of luck and good to hear from you.

 

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


ReplyQuote
Old Buck
Arbiter
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2490
 

How does water leak thru your roof?

Door gaskets are easy, and putting a headliner in isn't hard, just messy.

For the age and mileage of the vehicle, I wouldn't worry about stained headliners and such.  

There is a lot to consider as the condition of the transmission, suspension, and steering components.  Those usually take a shit before the engine does.  A complete brake overhaul will be due soon including the lines.  Save your money for the repairs that matter.

 

Do NOT chase tail. Turn yours around and live FREE!


ReplyQuote
The Evil Genius
Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 2225
 

You've seen my 92 Explorer so you know my answer! 


ReplyQuote
Umbra Ascensor
Moderator
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 172
Topic starter  

Everything so far is running sound. Like you all day, it's not worth it, but considering, I'm in it 2-3 hours a day 5 days a week, fixing it up would be nice. If I knew I had all the right tools, and the ability to get the job done, I'd do it no questions asked.


Beered by Old Buck, GregBO, The Evil Genius and 1 people
ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 3814
 

@pistolpete

Check PP. You certainly have a long history of getting the absolute best out of each and every vehicle investment.  Need I mention the Mustang! 😎 

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


Beered by Old Buck and #Redpillbible
ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 3814
 
Posted by: @umbra-ascensor

Everything so far is running sound. Like you all day, it's not worth it, but considering, I'm in it 2-3 hours a day 5 days a week, fixing it up would be nice. If I knew I had all the right tools, and the ability to get the job done, I'd do it no questions asked.

An Army Reserve buddy would purchase a "wreck" each year several months prior to our two week "annual training (A.T.)" period.  He would spend the time prior to A.T. in making the vehicle operational, obtaining a tag and determining what other "fixes" needed to be completed.  He packed all the tools, supplies and resources needed to bring the vehicle up to the standards that satisfied him into the vehicle and drove it to operational base.

Once at the base, he would spend each after duty afternoon/evening working on the vehicle.  He just loved working with his hands and working with a purpose.  Did I mention that he was a Vietnam era S.F. Physicians Assistant?  (He was the second U.S. Army Reservist within the Army mobilized and the first transferred to Active Duty operations during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, August 30, 1990.)

He stayed on base during the weekend and would drink a pint of whiskey, 1/2 on Saturday and 1/2 on Sunday.  On the last duty day (Friday) he would pack everything up and drive home.  Upon arrival, he would seek out someone in the community in need a serviceable vehicle.  He then transferred the title to them for $1.00, the cost on buying an envelope and mailing the title to the state capital. 

The next year he started the process again.  Basic cars, nothing fancy or complicated to fix and reliable entertainment while away from home.  This was a passion of his and for all I know, he is still doing it.  Not to sell the vehicle, not because he needs alternative transportation, but because he wants to.

If this repair is a passion, you will find a way to be successful in completing it.  Men always do! 

I proudly say the I learned quite a bit from helping "Chief Murray", he was a great mentor.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


Beered by Old Buck and #Redpillbible
ReplyQuote
Umbra Ascensor
Moderator
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 172
Topic starter  

Right now, I'm trying to save up some money. So it's not an anytime soon project.valso, that is cool what your army reserve buddy is doing.


ReplyQuote
GregBO
Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 3814
 

@umbra-ascensor

Check.  Chief Murray is a mature, grounded man who lives to enjoy life, and enjoys life immensely.  Have fun with the restoration and you might want to drive it south for P.P. to look at.  He has a long history of working on 70/80's era vehicles and keeping them working well past their prime!

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


Beered by Old Buck and #Redpillbible
ReplyQuote
Advertisements