Tough Hombres - The Origin  

 

GregBO
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26/10/2018 7:42 pm  

The U.S. Army 90th Infantry Division ("Tough 'Ombres") served in World Wars I and II.  The divisions lineage is carried on by the 90th Sustainment Brigade which provides logistical support for areas of operations. 90th Infantry Division.patch.svg

The units nickname of "Tough 'Ombres" originated because the unit was of Texas-Oklahoma origin and was represented by the T&O on the shoulder patch. [A khaki-colored square on which is superimposed a red letter "T", the lower part of which bisects the letter "O", also in red.]

The 90th served in the WWI St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne operations where 1.091 soldiers killed, and 6,458 wounded in action.

The unit was reconsituted as a state of Texas Reserve unit and later ordered to active military service on 25 March 1942.

90th Infantry Division personnel served with distinction in the following campaigns: Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes-Alsace, Rhineland and Central Europe.  The unit suffered 3,342 killed and 14,386 wounded in action casualties. 287 personnel are reported as Missing in Action and 1,185 were held as Prisoner of War.

The division received five unit citations and individual awards included 4 Medal of Honor, 54 Distinguished Service Cross, 4 Distinguished Service Medal (United Kingdom award), 419 Silver Star Medal, 19 Legion of Merit, 4 Distinguished Flying Cross, 55 Soldiers Medal, 140 Bronze Service Medal and 121 Air Medal.

The units first action was on Utah Beach, Normandy.  During offensive action to clear the Foret de Mont-Castre (Hill 122) objective in July, the Division suffered over 5000 killed, wounder, or captured soldiers. One of the highest casualty rates suffered in WWII.

An action of political note was that on 8 May, 1945 Oberst Eric Hartmann, along with the remainder of Jagdgeschwader 52 fighter wing surrendered to 90th I.D. personnel and were then turned over to the Russian Army.

Members of the 90th Sustainment Brigade continue to serve in Iraq and other overseas duty locations.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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may72020
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26/10/2018 8:31 pm  

funny we were talking about patches and the Tough Hombres was one I looked up. 

The road to the local lake is dedicated to the Iron Men of Metz. Interesting read about those guys.


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GregBO
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30/10/2018 9:17 pm  

While no longer a combat unit, the 90th Sustainment Brigade continues to be a top notch unit that directly supports war fighters.

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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Uly The Cunning
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31/10/2018 6:48 am  

The strongest and bravest wore the uniform. Many of the best of those wore that patch. 

"Remember, you're fighting for this woman's honor, which is probably more than she ever did."
Groucho Marx: Duck Soup (1933)


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GregBO
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31/10/2018 7:43 pm  
Posted by: Uly The Cunning

The strongest and bravest wore the uniform. Many of the best of those wore that patch. 

Agreed. While Special Operations members and Tab Warriors get all the news these days, man in WWI and WWII just answered the call to duty. They did their job to the best of their ability and hoped that it was enough to save themselves and squad mates.  The "US Army", "US Navy", and "US Marines" tapes were all that they really needed on their uniforms.  

It's all about the "U.S." and not "My Name is Me". 

​"What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal." -Albert Pike

​"​My father didn't tell me how to live; he lived, and let me watch him do it.​" - Clarence Buddinton Kelland


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uoSʎWodɹɐH
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Posts: 685
03/11/2018 5:08 am  

GregBo thank you for this.  The combining of Texas and Oklahoma  was not only interesting but hits home for me as I have family in both states and my legal battle concerns Me finding Comity between those two states concerning the civil rights I claim.  .  My father achieved comedy not comity LOL..

 

I was bound to be misunderstood, and I laugh at the idiots who misunderstand me! Kind mockery toward the well-intentioned and unfettered cruelty toward all would-be prison guards of my creative possibilities. In this way I learn to revel as much in misunderstanding as in understanding and take pleasure in worthy opponents. Making language fluid, flowing like a river, yet precise and pointed as a dirk, contradicts the socialistic purpose of language and makes for a wonderful verbal dance—a linguistic martial art with constant parries that hone the weapon that is the two edged sword of my mouth.


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